vsco

A short walk before breakfast

Whilst visiting the Suri people in Southwestern Ethiopia one of the things I was particularly keen to document was the traditional practice of taking and drinking cattle blood early in the morning. 

Cattle are of enormous significance to Suri men with a man's worth  judged by the number of cows he has.  In fact it's not uncommon for Suri men to risk their lives in protecting their cattle from raiders.  Typically adult men might own 30 or 40 cows, saving for the day when having amassed 60 head they are considered of marriageable status. 

Ethiopia © Toby Adamson / AXIOM
Ethiopia © Toby Adamson / AXIOM
Ethiopia © Toby Adamson / AXIOM
Ethiopia © Toby Adamson / AXIOM
Ethiopia © Toby Adamson / AXIOM
Ethiopia © Toby Adamson / AXIOM

Setting off just after dawn and guided by our armed escort Arbulo (meaning Black Bull) we waded the Kibbish river and headed up into the bush on the far bank.  After a brisk 40 minute walk we arrived at the corral of a man we had met and photographed on the river bank the previous evening and who had invited us to visit him with his cattle. Scanning the cattle with a very knowledgeable eye a young cow was selected and quickly cornered by the young herd boys who then held it ready for blood to be taken. 

Surma-4
Surma-4
Surma-6
Surma-6
Surma-7
Surma-7
Ethiopia © Toby Adamson / AXIOM
Ethiopia © Toby Adamson / AXIOM
Ethiopia © Toby Adamson / AXIOM
Ethiopia © Toby Adamson / AXIOM

Strangely the cattle were not particularly disturbed by any of this - perhaps used to this near daily activity.  A leather thong was quicky passed around the cows neck and tightened - it's jugular vein by this stage very pronounced but still a tiny target for for the bow and arrow held by one of the elder herd boys. 

Surma-9
Surma-9

One quick shot with a sharp arrow into the bulging jugular was all it took to release a throbbing stream of blood into the gourd bowl held ready.  Seconds later with the bowl full of vivid red blood the thong was removed and a small handful of mud pressed into the tiny cut.  The blood clotted almost instantly and the cow was released and trotted off to join the rest of the herd seemingly none the worse for it's experience.

Ethiopia © Toby Adamson / AXIOM
Ethiopia © Toby Adamson / AXIOM
Ethiopia © Toby Adamson / AXIOM
Ethiopia © Toby Adamson / AXIOM
Ethiopia © Toby Adamson / AXIOM
Ethiopia © Toby Adamson / AXIOM

With only minutes before the fresh blood would start to clot, two of the young herd boys quickly polished off the blood in a matter of seconds and then without another word the gate of the corral was opened and they quickly left and vanished into the bush with the cattle.

Ethiopia © Toby Adamson / AXIOM
Ethiopia © Toby Adamson / AXIOM
Ethiopia © Toby Adamson / AXIOM
Ethiopia © Toby Adamson / AXIOM

Photographing this event was always going to be at least a little bit tricky - with little or no verbal communication possible between me and the subjects there was no real way of telling what was about to happen and there was no option to say hang on a second whilst I change lenses or recompose.  With an already bright sun causing the usual problems of photographing black skin in broad daylight I chose to shoot with off camera fill in flash triggered through a Canon ETTL cable and shot through a combination of white brolly or small softbox.  Trying to get well composed images whilst slipping around in ankle deep cow shit is not the easiest thing to do and as always with hindsight there are always things you might do differently but in general I think I more or less caught the flavor of the morning if not the smell.

Surma-15
Surma-15

With the cattle gone it was back down to the river to wash off the the knee high reminder of the mornings experience and then back to the tents for our own altogether less adventurous breakfast.

Lightroom 4 - to use presets or not?

Lightroom 4 is my current image processing tool of choice.  Quicker and simpler to use than Photoshop and does most of what the average photographer needs in a few easy clicks of the mouse.  It's a great tool for editing images as well as captioning, keywording and generally making sense of the thousands of images we end up with spread over endless hard drives.

vsco
vsco

But the process of image manipulation is a tricky one - when you shoot an image do you know how you want it to end up looking or is it a question of chance where all the tweaking takes you?  Do you end up in the same place every time with a generic looking well balanced but slightly dull looking image after minutes spent adjusting exposure, white balance, shadows, highlights and the rest of the sliders...?

I came across VSCO Film recently - a really nice interesting series of Film Emulation presets for LR4, Aperture and Adobe Camera Raw.  With the film look being all the rage in digital processing at the moment these presets make the task of achieving this pretty straightforward.  The clever boffins at Visual Supply Co have done all the hard work for you and worked out all the settings you need to simulate your favourite film from years gone by - right down to the color shifts, the grain and softness.  There are 3 packs available featuring all the standards from Kodak, Ilford and Fuji with familiar names such as Portra, Neopan, Superia and Delta.  Film 03 is a bit more quirky as it features instant films like Polaroids and many other peel apart films.

These wont be to everyone's taste for sure but they do give you pretty extensive starting point for trying to work out the look you might be after - and maybe that's a whole new problem in itself.  Now instead of having an image to process manually and ending up with an average looking image you can now have literally hundreds of presets to choose from - many of them potentially interesting - and then what do you do, you will probably (like me) go through them one by one until you settle on something that gives you a pretty average looking image that's perhaps not that far from the image you'd have arrived at anyway but this way might take even longer. I've only just started exploring the possibilities these presets give you but I can already see that they work particularly well with well lit images whether in the studio or outdoors - more testing required!!

All that said I really like the product and if the film look is your thing then this is definitely a product worth looking into - not cheap but it might possibly (if you are careful) save you time in the long term.